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Polish Sausage, Cabbage & Potatoes Recipe

Polish Sausage, Cabbage & Potatoes Notes

When I was a small child my family (African-American) lived next door to a Polish family. We lived in Detroit, Michigan--about 5 minutes from Hamtramck where you could get the best polish sausage. My mother and our neighbor would exchange recipes. One of my favorites was a dish with polish sausage, cabbage, and potatoes. There were 8 children and 2 adults in our family and this meal was cheap but tasty.

Unfortunately, my mother passed away some years ago. Whenever my brothers and sisters visit, they still enjoy this dish when I make it. It brings back childhood memories. The one good thing about using Quebec Beef Spice for vegetables is that you can always add more after you cook them and you still get a wonderful flavor. I cut the recipe in half so it only feeds 6. I don't know what the real name of this dish is though.

Ingredients

Serves / Yields

6

Preparation Instructions

Saute onion, bell pepper and garlic in 2 tablespoons of the margarine or butter until tender. Add water. Layer cabbage, sausage, and potatoes and balance of butter and margarine in the pan. Season with Quebec Beef Spice and Old World Central Street Seasoning.

Cover and simmer on low heat until cabbage is desired doneness, stirring occasionally. This should only cook about 20 minutes or the time it takes to make the potatoes tender.

Helpful Hints

My husband likes his cabbage well done, but my family and I prefer it to be just barely tender. I like to omit the potatoes and sausage, cut down on the butter, and smother the cabbage. My husband is originally from Pennsylvania, and he begs me to add the sausage and potatoes whenever he sees me buying cabbage.

I discovered using Quebec Beef Spice for vegetables when my Aunt Augustine traveled to Kansas and had summer squash at a restaurant. She liked it so much that she asked the chef what seasoning he used. He told her it was Quebec Beef Spice from The Spice House, and it is available over the internet. She told me, and now I use it to season this dish and many other vegetable dishes. I didn't know this dish could get any better!

Incidentally, I am one of those cooks that just adds spices by sight and shaking - seasoning is approximate. Use more or less according to your taste.

Credit

This recipe was provided by Anita Seals-Page from Los Angeles.