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Ground Chipotle Chiles

Ground chipotle is a truly exciting alternative to black pepper. So exciting, in fact, we think you'll permit us to use the opportunity as a teaching moment: Mexico takes pepper seriously, and the big three get different names when they change state. Smoked jalapeños are chipotles; dried chilacas are pasillas ('little raisins'); and dried poblanos are anchos ('wide ones'). Also available in Whole Chipotle Chiles, or Canned Chipotle Chiles en Adobo

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The Spice House
The Spice House

Details

Chipotle chiles are dried jalapeño peppers that have been left on the vine to ripen to a cherry-red hue before being cured over woodsmoke. Ripening the jalapeños first gives these smokey chipotle peppers a delectably sweet and savory flavor, emitting notes of raspberry, cherry, and tomato. The word chipotle comes from the Nahuatl chīlpōctli, which means “smoked chile.” The Spice House’s chipotles are of the Morita variety, which are the most popular type in the Mexcian state of Chihuahua and in the United States. Morita means little blackberry or mulberry in Spanish, a nod to this variety's fruity sweetness. Ground chipotle Morita chile is a convenient powder that adds savory flavor and pleasant heat to stewed beans, chili con carne, and homemade salsas and spice rubs. Its heat level clocks in at 13,000 to 28,000 on Scoville Heat Scale, giving off a pleasant heat without singeing the palate. Ingredients: Chipotle chiles.

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Rated 5 out of 5
Review posted

Balanced, flavorful

Somewhat fruity aroma, making it a great choice for lighter options...excellent lightly dusted over eggs, for example. I think it plays best all by itself, or plausibly with granulated garlic. Still has enough body to work well on red meat.

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